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  Beara Archaeology
Ardgroom Stone Circle The Ardgroom Stone Circle stands in a field a couple of miles from the village. To find it, go to the Post Office in Ardgroom then head in the direction of Kenmare for approx. 2 miles, look for a minor road coming in from your right and a signpost pointing to the circle
     
Cashakeelty Cashakeelty stone circle stands high up in the mountains, and yet is easy enough to reach. If walking the Beara Way you will pass through it on your way from Ardgroom to Lauragh. If you are on the Ring of Beara make your way from Lauragh Post Office in the Ardgroom direction. Just before the road starts to snake there is a signpost with a parking area beyond
     
Hag 'An Chailleach Beara' The Hag of Beara is the narrator of the finest old Irish poem in existence. She is said to have lived seven life times before being turned to stone. She is mentioned in verse by Padraig Pearse "Mise Éire Siné mé ná an Cailleach Béara" The rock lies beside the coast road from Eyeries to Ardgroom on the Kilcatherine Peninsula. Find the turn to Loch Fada, keep on coast road for another mile and it is on your left at the top of a steep hill
     
Castletownbere Derreenataggart Stone Circle is close to Castletownbere. You to the top of the town to the Olde Bakery and take the road to the right and follow it up for about 2 miles, (at the junction keep left), the circle is on your right. There is a small parking area on your left opposite the entrance to the field
     
Leitrim Beg Leitrim Beg wedge grave stands in a farmer's field near Adrigole. Take the road east from Massmount for about 3 miles, keep an eye out for a sign pointing to your left
     
Uragh Uragh Stone Circle stands between the Cloonee and Gleninchaquin Lakes, surrounded on either side by spectacular mountains. In the background is the Inchaquin Waterfall. To get there take the road from Kenmare to Lauragh, opposite the Peacock Camping Site you will see a sign directing you to Gleninchaquin. Follow this road for about 4 miles until you come to a junction and it is off to your right
     
wedge grave This wedge grave lies close to the turn off to Dursey Island from the Allihies to Castletownbere road
     
Kenmare The Kenmare Stone Circle lies on the western side of Kenmare. If standing outside the AIB Bank cross over the end of Henry Street and continue walking, passing the shops and take the next left, then follow this road to the very end and you come to the entrance to the Stone Circle. An admission fee is often charged
     
Standing stone You will see this standing stone as you walk the Beara Way from Glengarriff to Bonane. If you are carrying a map note where the woodland area starts and then look over to your right (if heading towards Bonane). The stone is half a mile or so away, but well worth finding
     
Cloontream Cloontream wedge grave standsd high above Castletownbere. Follow the Beara Way from town, behind the Millbrook Bar, take the first turn to your left and continue on up it until you come to a gate. Carry on foot from here for about two miles and you will see it off to your left. Fine views can be had from it
     
Kilcatherine Kilcatherine Cemetary is well worth a visit. Follow the coast road from Eyeries to Ardgroom, you come across it soon after passing the Hag of Beara (above) The cemtary is thought to have been built by the same monks who built the beehive monastery on Skellig Michael. Some of the headstones are ancient, one of them just a cross hewn out of rock. There is also a famous cat's face just visible in the picture here above the arch
     
Bonane Ring Fort The Ring Fort in Bonane Heritage Park is just one of several archaelogical sites waiting to be viewed. Also there is a stone circle, a bullaun stone, a Famine Ruin, and an ancient cooking pit dating from the Bronze Age

A new book on Beara farming from 4000 BC has been published by The Collins Press of Cork, it is called 'Local Worlds' and is written by William O'Brien

Local Worlds

 
A link that might be of interest: The Beara Historical Society